Fairair - The right advice means the right choice

Interactive Guide

12345
Click here for a rundown on the different types of air conditioning units.

Step 1 - Things to consider

There are a number of things to consider about your house before you choose an air conditioner. These include:

Location

The local climate will affect your air conditioner choice. Not all units are suitable to all regions - evaporative systems do not work well in humid climates, for example.

Orientation

Rooms that face north, east or west are likely to receive more sun than rooms that face south and may need more cooling.

External shading

External shading such as blinds, canopies or even trees can help cut down the amount of heat entering a room. With proper shading, ventilation and insulation, your room may not need air conditioning at all.

Internal shading

Internal shading such as curtains and blinds is not as effective at keeping heat out as external shading, however, it can still have an effect.

Insulation

Having insulation in your roof, walls and floor will help to regulate temperatures inside your house.

Sealing

Ensuring you minimise gaps around windows etc will help reduce unwanted hot air coming into your home.

How many rooms do you want to cool?

The number of rooms you want to cool is important to consider.

It is relatively easy to select a system to cool a single room. Cooling multiple rooms using a single system can be very cost-effective, however, it requires some more in-depth consideration and calculations to find the right unit.



Next
Empty

Evaporative system

An evaporative system provides cooling by drawing air across a series of wetted "pads". Water on the pads evaporates as the air flows over it, cooling and humidifying the air.

Sometimes also referred to as a "swamp cooler".

Insulation

Any material that slows down the transfer of heat.

Multi-split systems

A multi-split system is a split system that has a single outdoor unit connected to multiple indoor units. It is possible to operate these systems independent of each other or at the same time. These systems are best suited to cooling multiple rooms.

Ducted system

A ducted system is one that provides cooling to multiple rooms through a series of ducts, which are usually installed in the roof.

Heat load calculation

A heat load calculation is the process a licensed contractor goes through to determine the amount of cooling required for a space. It takes into account a number of factors including the area being cooled, the physical properties of the building, its orientation, shading, insulation and local climate.

Licensed contractor

A licensed contractor is someone who holds a valid license under the Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas Management Regulations 1995.

All contractors are required by Australian law to hold one of these licenses in order to handle refrigerant. Always ask to see your installer or contractor's license before they install your air conditioner.

Visit www.arctick.org to find a licensed contractor in your area.

Depending on the kind of system being installed, the contractor should also have relevant state electrical and plumbing licenses - be sure to ask your installer to provide these before they install your air conditioner.

Zoned

A zoned system is usually a ducted system or a multi-split system where different areas of the home have been divided into "zones", and the zones can be controlled independently of one another (ie: can cool one zone independent of the others, or set different temperatures in different zones).

Heat load calculation

A heat load calculation is the process a licensed contractor goes through to determine the amount of cooling required for a space. It takes into account a number of factors including the area being cooled, the physical properties of the building, its orientation, shading, insulation and local climate.

Licensed contractor

A licensed contractor is someone who holds a valid license under the Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas Management Regulations 1995.

All contractors are required by Australian law to hold one of these licenses in order to handle refrigerant. Always ask to see your installer or contractor's license before they install your air conditioner.

Visit www.arctick.org to find a licensed contractor in your area.

Depending on the kind of system being installed, the contractor should also have relevant state electrical and plumbing licenses - be sure to ask your installer to provide these before they install your air conditioner.